Tag Archives: Socrates

What time did you take this photograph? Was it too early in the day for Social Dissonance? Were you curious enough to return at 7pm or didn’t you have the time? Or was it 7pm on a Monday, the day of rest for the performers? What did you make of the room, behind these doors? […]

When you made the video from which this still is taken, did you consider pausing at the word ‘DO’? As the next word of David Harding’s work at Rizari Park, taken from a Samuel Beckett poem, was ‘NOT’, could you have played Socrates, stopping in his tracks as he listened to his daimonion? Then through […]

On arriving in Bilbao last night I was excited to discover the collection of books that I left in Rebeka’s mother’s apartment, bought during our year sabbatical in Madrid (2014-15). Knowing that I would buy more books than I could fit in my suitcase, I not only left these books here on our way back […]

Dear Eric, Rereading what I wrote about Anabases yesterday it dawned on my how I cannot allow this week of posts about your book to become anything approximating a review. I am currently months behind the review of another book and taking this mode of writing on at the same time seems especially perverse. That […]

Dear Senator, As your constituent, I respectfully request that you work to increase State Share of Instruction (SSI) funding and remove the unwarranted, anti-faculty provisions that were added by the House to Am. Sub. HB 49. Below are my general concerns which I have framed by offering a pertinent example from my professional experience in […]

If you’re interested in Plato, you’re reading the wrong book. If you’re interested in difficult childhoods, sexual misadventures, aesthetics, cultural history, and the reasons that a club sandwich and other meals—including breakfast—have remained in the memory of the present writer, keep reading. —from Yvonne Rainer Feelings Are Facts: a life, 2013. 496 pp. | 7 […]

Today was my first time in the Wexner Center for the Arts after the end of the exhibition Leap Before You Look: Black Mountain College, 1933-1957. It was a strange experience as I’d lived with that exhibition in such an intimate way over the past few months. I taught two classes that inspired and engaged […]